31 October 2019

Open Access Round-up: 31 October 2019

Below is a listing of Open Access literature that I have referenced on this blog since 15 October 2019. If you are not familiar with Open Access, please visit my other blog for an introduction.

See also this list for a quick look at different types of Open Access.

Green Open Access [info]

"The Allure of Distant War Drums: Refugees, Geography, and Foreign Policy Preferences in Turkey," Political Geography, vol. 74 (Oct. 2019)
- Preprint version of article.
- The postprint version of this article is currently under embargo.
- Authors are based in the UK and US.

"Closing the Border," New York University Law Review (Forthcoming)
- Preprint version of article.
- Author is based in the US.

Death of the Particular Social Group (SSRN, Oct. 2019)
- Preprint version of article.
- Author is based in the US.

"Denying Citizenship: Immigration Enforcement and Citizenship Rights in the United States," Studies in Law, Politics, and Society (Forthcoming)
Preprint version of article.
- Authors are based in the US.

European Union Citizenship and the Unlawful Denial of Member State Nationality (SSRN, Sept. 2019)
Preprint version of article.
- Author is based in the Netherlands.

"Extraterritorial Rights in Border Enforcement," Washington and Lee Law Review (Forthcoming)
- Preprint version of article.
- Author is based in the US.

"Refugees, Xenophobia, and Domestic Conflict: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Turkey," Journal of Peace Research, vol. 55, no. 4 (2018)
- Postprint version of article.
- Authors are based in Turkey, the UK and US.

"Variation in Policy Success: Radical Right Populism and Migration Policy," West European Politics, vol. 42, no. 3 (2019)
- Preprint version of article.
- Author is based in Switzerland.

Gold/Diamond Open Access

Articles:

"Colombia's Armed Conflict and Its Refugees: International Legal Protection versus Interregional State Interests," Colombia Internacional, vol. 100 (Oct. 2019)
- Author is based in Spain. No APC.

"International Institutions: Policies and Problems on the International Protection of Internally Displaced Colombians," Relaciones Internacionales, vol. 40 (2019)
- Authors are based in Brazil. No APC.

"The Linguistic Integration of Refugees in Italy," Social Sciences, vol. 8, no. 10 (Oct. 2019)
- Authors are based in Spain. APC is 1000 CHF.

"Migrants in Transit through Mexico to the US: Experiences with Violence and Related Factors, 2009-2015," PLOS One, 14(8): e0220775 (Aug. 2019)
- Authors are based in Chile and Mexico. APC is US$1,595.

Books:

Caught in Between Borders: Citizens, Migrants and Humans -  Liber Amicorum in Honour of  Prof. Dr. Elspeth Guild (Wolf Legal Publishers, Sept. 2019)

Politics of (Dis)Integration (Springer, Oct. 2019)

The Refugee Reception Crisis: Polarized Opinions and Mobilizations (Éditions de l'Université de Bruxelles, Oct. 2019)

Hybrid Open Access [info]

"Shall We Receive More Refugees or Not? A Comparative Analysis and Assessment of Portuguese Adolescents’ Arguments, Views, and Concerns," Pedagogy, Culture & Society, Latest Articles, 12 Oct. 2019
- Authors are based in Portugal. APC is €2395.

Law Reviews

Note: These articles are considered Bronze Open Access, i.e., they are free-to-read but no other permissions are associated with them.

"Alienating Citizens," Northwestern University Law Review, vol. 114, no. 1 (2019)
- Author is based in the US.

"Becoming Unconventional: Correcting the 'Particular Social Group' Ground for Asylum," North Carolina Journal of International Law, vol. 44, no. 3 (2019)
- Author is based in the US.

"Immigration Unilateralism and American Ethnonationalism," Loyola University Chicago Law Journal, vol. 51, no. 1 (2019)
- Author is based in the US.

Related post:
Open Access Round-up: 15 October 2019

Tagged Publications.

30 October 2019

News: New Data & Research on U.S. "Remain in Mexico" Policy

The U.S. Immigration Policy Center (USIPC) at UC San Diego has published a report and policy brief that "show asylum seekers are being sent to Mexico despite telling U.S. immigration officials their persecutor(s) can find and have access to them there. Data also show violence and homelessness are systematic."

Two key findings "based on over 600 interviews with asylum seekers who have been returned to Mexico under the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the 'Remain in Mexico' policy":

"Safeguards against refoulement are not being implemented under MPP and asylum seekers are being returned to Mexico despite telling U.S. immigration officials that their persecutor(s) can find and have access to them in Mexico;

The data show that previous reporting on the harrowing circumstances asylum seekers experience in Mexico do, in fact, amount to systematic trends."

More findings are summarized in this blog post and Twitter thread.

Read the report: Seeking Asylum: Part 2

Read the policy brief: Walls to Protection: The Grim Reality of Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” Policy

See also related interview in The Guardian.

Tagged Publications.

Regional Focus: Americas - Pt. 2

Reports & journal articles:

"The 1984 Cartagena Declaration: A Critical Review of Some Aspects of Its Emergence and Relevance," Refugee Survey Quarterly, Advance Articles, 14 Oct. 2019 [abstract]

"As More Migrants from Africa and Asia Arrive in Latin America, Governments Seek Orderly and Controlled Pathways," Migration Information Source, 22 Oct. 2019 [full-text]

Caught in the Middle: West African Migration through the Americas (Mixed Migration Centre, Oct. 2019) [text]
- See also related video report from The New Humanitarian.

"Changing U.S. Policy and Safe-Third Country 'Loophole' Drive Irregular Migration to Canada," Migration Information Source, 22 Oct. 2019 [full-text]

"Colombia's Armed Conflict and Its Refugees: International Legal Protection versus Interregional State Interests," Colombia Internacional, vol. 100 (Oct. 2019) [open access]

‘Doble afectación’: Living with Disasters and Conflict in Colombia (ODI, Oct. 2019) [access]
- Follow link for report, and executive summary in English and Spanish.

*Fight and Flight: Tackling the Roots of Honduras’ Emergency, Report, no. 77 (International Crisis Group, Oct. 2019) [text]

*"International Institutions: Policies and Problems on the International Protection of Internally Displaced Colombians," Relaciones Internacionales, vol. 40 (2019) [open access]

"Migrants in Transit through Mexico to the US: Experiences with Violence and Related Factors, 2009-2015," PLOS One, 14(8): e0220775 (Aug. 2019) [open access]

Slamming the Golden Door: Canada- U.S. Migration Policy and Asylum Seekers, SPP Communique, vol. 12, no. 23 (Univ. of Calgary, Sept. 2019) [text]

*UPDATED

Related post:
- Regional Focus: Americas - Pt. 1 (30 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.


Regional Focus: Americas - Pt. 1

Blog posts & press:

Mexico Needs a Better Asylum System (RI Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Q&A: How to Stem the Fastest-growing Refugee Crisis in Latin American History," The New Humanitarian, 29 Oct. 2019 [text]
- See also conference materials referenced below.

US Will Send Migrants to El Salvador, a Country That Can’t Protect Its Own People (The Conversation, Oct. 2019) [text]

U.S.-Mexico Joint Declaration (U.S. State Dept., June 2019) [text]
- See also Spanish version.

Multimedia:

International Solidarity Conference on the Venezuelan Refugee and Migrant Crisis, Brussels, 28-29 Oct. 2019 [info]
- Follow link for livestream videos and various conference materials. See also joint press release, UNHCR's opening remarks, a joint NGO statement, and the joint communique from the conference co-chairs. IRC provided these recommendations prior to the conference.

Latin American Responses to the Venezuelan and Nicaraguan Migration Crises, Washington, DC, 29 Oct. 2019 [info]
- Audio and/or video of this event will eventually be posted.


Related post:
- Regional Focus: Americas (4 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.


29 October 2019

Regional Focus: United States - Pt. 2

Reports & journal articles:

"Becoming Unconventional: Correcting the 'Particular Social Group' Ground for Asylum," North Carolina Journal of International Law, vol. 44, no. 3 (2019) [full-text]

"Closing the Border," New York University Law Review (Forthcoming) [preprint]

*Death of the Particular Social Group (SSRN, Oct. 2019) [preprint]

East Bay Sanctuary Covenant v. Trump - Restrictions on Asylum (U.S. Courts of the Ninth Circuit, 2019) [access]
- Follow link for texts of briefs submitted in this case, including UNHCR's amicus brief.

"Executive Overreaching in Immigration Adjudication," Tulane Law Review, vol. 93, no. 4 (2019) [SSRN]

"Extraterritorial Rights in Border Enforcement," Washington and Lee Law Review (Forthcoming) [preprint]

"Immigration Unilateralism and American Ethnonationalism," Loyola University Chicago Law Journal, vol. 51, no. 1 (2019) [full-text]
- See also related Immigration Impact blog post.

Orders from Above: Massive Human Rights Abuses Under Trump Administration Return to Mexico Policy (Human Rights First, Oct. 2019) [text]
- See also related Immigration Impact blog post.

Trauma at the Border:  The Human Cost of Inhumane Immigration Policies (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Oct. 2019) [text]
- See also related press release in English and Spanish.

Voices of the Banned: The Trump Administration’s Exclusion of Muslims Seeking Refuge (Refugees International, Oct. 2019) [text]

*UPDATED

Related post:
Regional Focus: United States - Pt. 1 (29 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.


Regional Focus: United States - Pt. 1

Blog posts & press:

"4 Federal Judges Rule against Trump on Immigration Issues in 1 Day," ABA Journal, 15 Oct. 2019 [text]

*"Amnesty Leaders Condemn US's Remain in Mexico Policy as 'Disgrace'," The Guardian, 25 Oct. 2019 [text]

New Process in El Paso Seeks to Deport Asylum Seekers in Less Than 10 Days (Immigration Impact Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

“Identical Twins. Identical Asylum Claims. Very Different Luck at the Border,” Los Angeles Times, 18 Oct. 2019 [text]

Supreme Court Accepts Review in Three Immigration Cases in October Alone (ImmigrationProf Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Trump's New Border Courts are Designed to Fail (The Hill, Oct. 2019) [text]

*USCIS: The (Mostly Awful) Year in Review (The Asylumist Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

*Who Wants to Be an Asylum Officer? Apparently, Not Many Asylum Officers (The Asylumist Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Government documents:

Executive Office for Immigration Review Announces Case Completion Numbers for Fiscal Year 2019 (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Oct. 2019) [text via ImmigrationProf Blog]

U.S. Department of Justice Prosecuted a Record-Breaking Number of Immigration-related Cases in Fiscal Year 2019 (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Oct. 2019) [text via ImmigrationProf Blog]

USCIS’ FY 2019 Accomplishments and Efforts to Implement President Trump’s Goals (USCIS, Oct. 2019) [text via ImmigrationProf Blog]

Multimedia:

How Trump Politicized Refugees (Niskanen Center, Oct. 2019) [access]
- Follow link for podcast and transcript.

Reporting Immigration in the Era of Trump: A Conversation with Jonathan Blitzer, Staff Writer for The New Yorker (Tempest Tossed, Oct. 2019) [access]
- Follow link for podcast.

*Zero Tolerance (PBS' Frontline, Oct. 2019) [access]
- Follow link for video. See also related Frontline announcement.

*UPDATED

Related posts:
Thematic Focus: Detention - Pt. 2 (Libya, U.S.) (17 Oct. 2019)
Thematic Focus: Solutions - Pt. 2 (U.S.) (10 Oct. 2019)
- Regional Focus: United States - Pt. 1 (9 Oct. 2019)
Regional Focus: United States - Pt. 2 (9 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.

News: New Open Access Books

Sophie Hinger & Reinhard Schweitzer, eds., Politics of (Dis)Integration (Springer, Oct. 2019) [access]
- "This open access book explores how contemporary integration policies and practices are not just about migrants and minority groups becoming part of society but often also reflect deliberate attempts to undermine their inclusion or participation. This affects individual lives as well as social cohesion."

Marco Martiniello, Bart Meuleman, Andrea Rea & Alessandro Mazzola, eds., The Refugee Reception Crisis: Polarized Opinions and Mobilizations (Éditions de l'Université de Bruxelles, Oct. 2019) [access]
- "This book has three objectives. First, it intends to examine public opinion towards asylum seekers and refugees through a European cross-national perspective. Second, it explains the public opinion polarization by focusing on pro- and anti-migrant mobilization, and investigating the practices of hospitality and hostility in local communities. The third objective is to understand asylum seekers’ and refugees’ own perceptions of receiving countries and their asylum systems."

Look for these titles and many more on the Open Access Books page of the Forced Migration Library.

Tagged Publications.

News: Sadako Ogata

Sadako Ogata, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees from 1991-2000, has passed away. She was 92 years old. Mrs. Ogata was the first woman to lead UNHCR. She dealt with numerous humanitarian crises during her tenure, including in northern Iraq, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, and the Great Lakes region of Africa. She later wrote a book about those years, entitled The Turbulent Decade: Confronting the Refugee Crises of the 1990s (Norton, 2005).

Mrs. Ogata was the HC during my time at UNHCR. As an academic, she was very supportive of in-house research efforts, building library collections, and disseminating information. The first State of the World's Refugees was published in 1993, soon after she joined the organization. And it was under her watch that the Centre for Documentation on Refugees became the Centre for Documentation and Research. As part of the CDR team, I contributed to the development of a suite of information resources on CD-ROM (the first Refworld!). Moreover, in 1996, CDR oversaw the production of the first UNHCR web site.

You can read Mrs. Ogata's speeches here.

Tagged Publications.


27 October 2019

Open Access Week: In Closing

As a way to round out Open Access Week, here is a mini bibliography of recent OA research produced (in whole or part) by authors based at institutions in the Global South:

"Cognitive Frames in Media Discourse: 'The Guardian' Coverage of the Syrian Refugee Crisis in Europe (2015-2019)," Arab World English Journal, vol. 10, no. 3 (2019) [gold OA]
- Author is based in Tunisia. APC is $200.

"Countering Hate Speech against Refugees and Migrants: An Evaluation of International Human Rights Treaties and Soft Law Instruments,” Revista Relaciones Internacionales, vol. 92, no. 1 (Jan.-June, 2019) [diamond OA]
- Author is based in Costa Rica. Publication costs are covered by the National Univ. of Costa Rica.

"Disability among Palestinian Elderly in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (oPt): Prevalence and Associated Factors," BMC Public Health, 19:432 (April 2019) [gold OA]
- Authors are based in Hungary and the Occupied Palestinian Territory. 50% APC discount available for authors based in the West Bank and Gaza.

"Esquema Tipológico de las Migraciones y Desplazamientos Forzados," Estudios Fronterizos, vol. 20, e028 (June 2019) [diamond OA]
- Authors are based in Mexico. No publication fees.

"How to Improve Sustainability: The Critical Role of Education for Syrian Refugees," Development in Practice, vol. 29, no. 5 (2019) [hybrid OA]
- Authors are based in Lebanon and Qatar. No APC waivers for hybrid OA.

"Human Trafficking among Ethiopian Returnees: Its Magnitude and Risk Factors," BMC Public Health, 19:104 (Jan. 2019) [gold OA]
- Authors are based in Ethiopia. APC automatically waived.

"Impact of Internally Displaced Persons on Forest and Vegetation of Jere LGA, Borno State, Nigeria," Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management, vol. 23, no. 5 (2019) [diamond OA]
- Authors are based in Nigeria. No publication fees.

"Migrants in Countries in Crisis: The Experiences of Ghanaian and Nigerien Migrants during the Libyan Crisis of 2011," African Human Mobility Review, vol. 5, no. 2 (May-Aug. 2019) [bronze OA]
- Authors are based in Ghana and Niger. Publication costs are covered by the Scalabrini Inst. for Human Mobility in Africa.

"Rohingya: The Stateless Community Becoming the Lost Generation," Journal of Economic Development, Environment and People, vol. 8, no. 2 (2019) [gold OA]
- Authors are based in Bangladesh. APC is 100 EUR.

"The Role of Rights-based Social Work in Contemporary Latin American Diasporas: The Case of Venezuelan Migrant Children," Journal of Human Rights and Social Work (Forthcoming, 2019) [green OA]
- Authors are based in Brazil. Postprint deposited in SSRN.

"Total Quality Management Boosters and Blockers in a Humanitarian Setting: An Exploratory Investigation," SAGE Open, vol. 9, no. 2 (April 2019) [gold OA]
- Authors are based in Bahrain, Malaysia, UK, US and Vietnam. APC is $800.

"When Solidarity is Trampled by Religious Sentiment: Outlining Indonesian Muslim Solidarity toward Rohingya Refugees," JSP: Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik, vol. 23, no. 1 (2019) [diamond OA]
- Authors are based in Indonesia. No publication fees.

Many more OA references will be forthcoming on this blog, so keep checking in!

Tagged Publications.



26 October 2019

Open Access Week: OA Types

So far, I have been referring to three different categories of Open Access. To review:

Green Open Access: Authors self-archive or deposit a pre- or postprint of an article in a repository of some kind or on an author web site.

Gold Open Access: Authors publish articles in a fully open access journal, often upon payment of a publication fee or "article processing charge" (APC).

Hybrid Open Access: Authors publish OA articles in a traditional subscription-based journal upon payment of an APC.

However, new categories continue to crop up in the literature. Several that are more relevant for my purposes are as follows:

Diamond Open Access: Authors publish articles in a fully open access journal that does not require payment of a fee or APC.

Bronze Open Access: Authors publish articles in an online journal that offers free-to-read articles but does not include a license that specifies reuse or other rights associated with open access. This type of journal does not meet the criteria for inclusion in the DOAJ. Also referred to as "Gratis OA."

Temporary Open Access: Traditional publishers often make certain articles freely available to read for a temporary period of time. Usually, there are no additional permissions associated with this access.

In the end, Open Access is a spectrum with many variations, as can be seen on this chart.

Tagged Publications.

Regional Focus: Syria

Media:

"Donald Trump Declares Syria Ceasefire Permanent and Lifts Turkey Sanctions," The Guardian, 23 Oct. 2019 [text]
- See also related Vox article.

"In Northeast Syria, a Civilian Exodus and a Fast-moving Aid Response," The New Humanitarian, 14 Oct. 2019 [text]

Latest Refugee Influx to Iraq Passes 10,000 Mark as Humanitarian Needs Mount in Syria (UNHCR, Oct. 2019) [text]

"The Syria Withdrawal’s Other Victims," New Republic, 24 Oct. 2019 [text]

Blog posts:

Assessing Turkey’s “Resettlement” Plans in Syria under the Law of Occupation (Just Security, Oct. 2019) [text]

Deportation to Syria Could Mean Death for Women, Children and LGBTQ Refugees in Turkey (The Conversation, Oct. 2019) [text]

Most Turks Support the Syrian Invasion. Here’s Why (WP's Monkey Cage, Oct. 2019) [text]
- Note: The two academic articles referenced in this post are included below.

Proposed Refugee Resettlement into Syrian “Safe Zone” Carries Significant Risks (DevPolicy Blog, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

*A State of Emergency in North-east Syria: Hundreds of Thousands Displaced and a Muted International Response (IDMC Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Syria’s Kurds and the Turkish Border (Past & Present Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Syria's Northeast Still at Risk after "Safe Zone" Deal (RI Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Syrian Refugees in Turkey are There to Stay, at Least for Now (The Conversation, Oct. 2019) [text]

Reports:

"The Allure of Distant War Drums: Refugees, Geography, and Foreign Policy Preferences in Turkey," Political Geography, vol. 74 (Oct. 2019) [embargoed postprint] [preprint]

Erdogans Security Zone: Refugees and Humanitarian Aid in North East Syria (Rojava Info. Center, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Refugees, Xenophobia, and Domestic Conflict: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Turkey," Journal of Peace Research, vol. 55, no. 4 (2018) [postprint]

Sent to a War Zone: Turkey’s Illegal Deportations of Syrian Refugees (Amnesty International, Oct. 2019) [access]
- See also related Human Rights Watch report.

Syria: Damning Evidence of War Crimes and Other Violations by Turkish Forces and Their Allies  [text]

Syria: Displacement in the Northeast (ACAPS, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

*UPDATED

Related posts:
- Regional Focus: MENA, incl. Syria - Pt. 1 (11 Oct. 2019)
Regional Focus: MENA, incl. Syria - Pt. 2 (11 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.



25 October 2019

Open Access Week: Fee Waivers

As a librarian, I am primarily focused on helping users find and access full-text research literature. As such, when I think of the advantages of Open Access, it is mainly from the consumer's perspective.  But being able to publish in Open Access mechanisms is equally important. OA research gets read and downloaded more often and has been shown to have a citation advantage. Research that is published immediately means that new findings are shared earlier and circulated more quickly, and an article is available to be cited for that much longer. Research that is posted online is also indexed by Google Scholar which enhances its discoverability.

As this previous post noted, academics from the Global South may be able to access and read more research freely when it is OA, but the rising costs of APCs are making it more difficult for them to participate in the global scholarly communication process and to ensure that their research is visible to an international audience.

The CFPs posted yesterday included references to fee waiver programs. Is this another potential solution to the publishing barriers presented by APCs? This study found that most of the large journal publishers do have some kind of waiver policy in place, but this applies principally to APCs for Gold Open Access journals; hybrid journals are generally excluded. The reasoning is that authors with limited financial means can simply publish their articles in a subscription-based journal in the usual way at no cost, and then use the Green route to make their article OA. (Note: For a while, Oxford Journals was the exception to this rule; however, as of this year, they no longer provide reduced rate developing country charges for hybrid OA.)

Here is waiver information for some of the more well-known Gold OA publishers that forced migration authors have published with:

BioMed Central/Springer [info]
- Offers full waivers to authors based in certain low-income countries and a 50% discount to authors based in other lower-middle-income countries. Authors can also apply for discretionary waivers.

Frontiers [info]
- "In cases where authors do not have the means to pay the APCs, they can apply for full or partial waivers. Please complete our Waiver Application form online, and allow up to two weeks for Frontiers to review and reply to your request."

Medknow [info]
- Offers full waivers to authors based in certain low-income countries and a 50% discount to authors based in other lower-middle-income countries. Authors can also apply for discretionary waivers.

MDPI [info]
- "Waivers may be granted at the Publisher's discretion and should be discussed with the editorial office when submitting the article."

PLOS [info]
- Offers 1) a Global Participation Initiative whereby authors whose research is funded by institutions in Group 1 will automatically not be charged a fee; those in Group 2 will be charged $500; and 2) a Publication Fee Assistance (PFA) program for authors unable to pay all or part of their  publication fees and who can demonstrate financial need (this includes authors who fell into group 2 above).

Judging from this brief list, even though most publishers have a waiver policy in place, not all of them offer automatic waivers to authors based in low-income countries. This means there is no guarantee that APCs will be reduced or eliminated for many Global South researchers. Moreover, as this researcher notes, the process for securing a waiver is not a straightforward one:

"The consortium then had to enter into lengthy correspondences with several journals to, firstly, prove that the majority of their authors were from LMICs (and therefore automatically entitled to a waiver), and secondly, to secure the waiver in writing. This back and forth to secure waivers is not uncommon for authors based in LMICs. In short, authors continually have to prove how ‘poor’ they are."

In the end, waivers are only a partial solution.  The risk remains that valuable research goes unpublished and unseen when financial hurdles cannot be overcome.



24 October 2019

CFPs: Open Access Journals

As a follow-up to yesterday's post, here are various opportunities for publishing in a Gold Open Access journal. Most don't require payment of an APC; those that do also offer discounts via institutional membership programs or opportunities to apply for a fee waiver.

No APC required:

Journal of International Humanitarian Action [info]
- Articles sought for special collection on "Humanitarian Protection." No deadline indicated. APCs are covered by the Network on Humanitarian Action.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs [info]
- Contributions sought for special issue on "Gender and Humanitarianism." Submit abstracts by 3 November 2019.

Forced Migration Review [info]
- Contributions sought for thematic issue on "Cities and Towns." Submission deadline is 4 November 2019.

Journal on Education in Emergencies [info]
- Contributions sought for special issue on "Psychosocial Support and Social and Emotional Learning in Emergencies." Abstract submission deadline is 15 November 2019.

Statelessness and Citizenship Review [info]
- Contributions are sought for next issue of this new journal. Submissions deadline is 15 January 2020.

*International Review of the Red Cross [info]
- Contributions sought for topical issue on The Sahel. Submission deadline is 31 January 2020.

APC required:

Frontiers in Education [info]
- Contributions sought for a research topic on "Education, Forced Migration, and Disability." Submission deadline is 29 October 2019. Depending on type of article submitted, APCs range from $0-$950. Some institutions have a membership with Frontiers, which either reduces or eliminates APCs for authors. Frontiers also has a fee waiver program.

Laws [info]
- Contributions sought for special issue on "Migrants and Human Rights Protections." Submission deadline is 30 April 2020. APC is 1000 CHF (Swiss francs). Authors whose institutions have joined MDPI's membership program receive discounts. A fee waiver program is available.

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [info]
- Contributions sought for special issue on "Community-Based Global Mental Health for Refugees and other Migrants." Submission deadline is 1 May 2020. APC is 1800 CHF (Swiss francs). Authors whose institutions have joined MDPI's membership program receive discounts. A fee waiver program is available.

Palgrave Communications [info]
- Papers sought for a research collection on "Migration, Poverty and Inequality." Submissions accepted on a rolling basis until 1 May 2020. APC is $1180. A fee waiver program is available.

*UPDATED

Tagged Periodicals and Events & Opportunities.

23 October 2019

Open Access Week: APCs

The focus of today's post is the APC, or "article processing charge." An APC is a fee that is charged to authors to make their articles open access in either a fully open access journal (Gold OA) or in a hybrid journal (i.e., a traditional subscription-based journal that will make an individual article OA upon payment of an APC). It is often referred to as the "author pays" model, but in reality, it is the author's employer or funding body that normally ends up paying the APC.

Rising costs

APCs have been increasing significantly for both OA types over the years, rising faster than the cost of inflation. This report cites a mean average increase of 16% from 2013 to 2016 for APCs paid in the UK. It also finds that the APCs for hybrid journals are typically higher than for Gold journals, although the gap is narrowing (p. 39).

This table lists the APCs for publishing a hybrid OA article in various forced migration-related journals. In 2016, most of the APCs for these journals hovered around $3000. Emerald and Brill were the exceptions, with APCs as low as $1595 and $1830, respectively. Three years later, most APCs have increased, with the four Oxford Journal titles assessing the highest fees. The 2019 range is $2350 to $3828.

Impacts

Ultimately, this upward trend in APCs has consequences, as summarized in this blog post:

"The APC model represents a lateral move in terms of access, greatly improving access for readers but shifting the inequity in the system onto authors. It allows everyone to read the work of others, but limits the ability to publish one’s own work to those with sufficient funds to cover the costs of doing so. This greatly disadvantages authors from less-wealthy regions of the world, along with unfunded researchers, and entire fields without the significant funding structures found in some of the sciences that are largely driving the move to APC models."

The proliferation of the APC business model has been particularly challenging for authors in the Global South. As this researcher notes, "The cost of a PlosOne article is 20% of the cost of a Masters student’s scholarship. So the choice is 'do I give a Masters student a scholarship, or publish more in open access journals?'" A study of publication in emergency medicine and critical care journals found that "[w]hen Purchasing Power Parity was considered, compared to United States authors, article process charges were shown to be 2.24 times more expensive for South African authors, 1.75 times more for Chinese authors, 2.28 times more for Turkish authors and 1.56 times more for Brazilian authors."

In addition, the APC model has spurred the rise of a slew of Gold OA journals with dubious reputations that promise quick peer review and provide misleading information on their web sites. In an attempt to raise awareness about the existence of these journals, various blacklists were compiled, the most well-known - and controversial - being "Beall's List of Predatory Journals and Publishers." Assessments of the list found that many of the criteria it used to designate a journal as predatory were general enough that they could be applied to any journal, even those known to be reputable. While this list has now been discontinued, its influence has unfortunately resulted in the demonization of many OA journals that are legitimate but have had quality issues for other reasons, including many in the Global South. Moreover, many of the articles published in so-called "predatory" journals have tended to be submitted by authors based in Africa and Asia. As this blog post notes, the negative fall-out that has resulted from Beall's list is that "has cast doubt on the authenticity of excellent research produced in the global south."

Strategies

These are complex challenges and coming up with a more equitable OA model is and has been the subject of much discussion.  Given that any new approaches will take time to implement, what can  forced migration authors can do right now?

Choose a diamond/platinum journal.

The good news is that most of the fully open access journals relevant to the forced migration research community do not levy APCs; these are often referred to as "Diamond" or "Platinum" journals. Rather, they use one of the many other business models available to journal publishers. This page lists 22 different titles and provides a table that indicates whether or not they undertake peer review, what OA license they provide, and, if relevant, the cost of their APC. Only three charge fees, which also happen to be lower than the hybrid APCs referenced in the other table.

Choose a journal that uses an alternative funding model.

Several journals on the list are new, including two that are supported by academic/NGO collaborations:
1) Journal of Humanitarian Affairs, brought to you by Save the Children UK, MSF's CRASH and the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at the Univ. of Manchester;

2) Statelessness and Citizenship Review, launched by the Univ. of Melbourne & Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion;

And a third that is part of a pilot project:
3) Migration & Society, published by Berghahn. This latter journal will become OA in 2020, using a "subscribe-to-open" model which is "a form of subscription that allows libraries to direct funds through the same subscription channels routinely used to provide journal access to their own researcher community, while also supporting the journals’ readership across a wider community as an open access publication."

Choose a regional journal.

Also on the list is REMHU: Revista Interdisciplinar da Mobilidade Humana. It is one of many OA journals listed on SciELO, a Latin American endeavor that, along with Redalyc, has helped to promote a "highly successful system of free of charge publishing (for authors)...for more than two decades" (Tennant et al., 2019, p. 9).

African Journals Online (AJOL) is another collection of quality journals originating in Africa, many of which are OA.

To search for even more Gold journals of interest, check out the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). There are over 10,000 titles listed that do not charge publication fees! Use the "country of publisher" filter to identify other journals published in the Global South (e.g., there are over 1100 titles listed for Indonesia).

Choose the Green route to make your work OA.

See also yesterday's post on preprint servers.

Tagged Publications and Web Sites/Tools.


22 October 2019

Regional Focus: Africa

Opportunity:

CFP: Disrupting Theory, Unsettling Practice: Towards Transformative Forced Migration Scholarship and Policy, Accra, 27-30 June 2020 [info]
- Note: " Part of the conference programme will be organised and run by Liberian refugees living in the nearby Buduburam camp." Submisssion deadline for papers and panels is 4 November 2019.

Blog posts & media:

African Migration and the Charade of ‘Return to Safety’ (Africa is a Country, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Eritrean Refugees Defy Border Closures Only to Find Hardship in Ethiopia," The New Humanitarian, 21 Oct. 2019 [text]

‘How is your research going to benefit me?’: Bringing Findings Back to Communities in Ghana (ODI Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Pressure Builds on Burundian Refugees in Tanzania Amid Threat of Forced Return," The New Humanitarian, 15 Oct. 2019 [text]
- See also related commentary.

Regional Exchange on Experiences in Supporting Resilience and Durable Solutions to Internal Displacement in the IGAD Region, 12th Regional Consultative Process (RCP) of the Inter-governmental Authority on Development (IGAD) on Migration, Addis Ababa, 7-8 Oct. 2019 [info]
- Read the concept note.

Publications:

Conflict Trends in Africa, 1989–2018 (PRIO, Oct. 2019) [text]

Nigeria at a Crossroads: The Political Stakes of Migration Governance (MEDAM, Oct. 2019) [text]

*No Confidence: Displaced South Sudanese Await ‘Real Peace’ (Refugees International, Oct. 2019) [text]

*Owned Spaces and Shared Places: Refugee Access to Livelihoods and Housing, Land, and Property in Uganda (REACH, Sept. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

Quarterly Mixed Migration Update (Mixed Migration Centre, Oct. 2019)
- East Africa
North Africa

Returning to Stability? Refugee Returns in the Great Lakes Region (International Refugee Rights Initiative, Oct. 2019) [text]
- See also French version.

Scaling Fences: Voices of Irregular African Migrants to Europe (UNDP, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]
- See also related UN news story.

Shifting Borders: Africa’s Displacement Crisis and Its Security Implications (Africa Center for Strategic Studies, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

The State of African Regional Human Rights Bodies and Mechanisms (2018-2019) (Amnesty International, Oct. 2019) [text]

War, Migration and Work: Changing Social Relations in the South Sudan Borderlands (Rift Valley Institute, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

*UPDATED

Related posts:
Regional Focus: Africa - Pt. 1 (3 Oct. 2019)
Regional Focus: Africa - Pt. 2 (3 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.

Open Access Week: Green OA Trends


Today's post looks at some open access trends and developments relating to Green Open Access.

OA figures on my blog (a microcosm!)

But first, here are the year-to-date (YTD) figures (i.e., January to mid-October 2018) for the different categories of OA literature that I track, compared with previous years:

                           2015   2017   2018   2019 (ytd)
- Gold OA*         163     246     269     225
- Green OA**       60       65      59        73
- Hybrid OA          21       61      99      102

*These figures do not include a count of articles published in issues of forced migration-specific gold OA journals, like Intervention and Refuge, or in special issues of other gold OA journals that focused on forced migration issues. Total article counts for these over the last three years are: 294 (2017); 358 (2018); 319 (2019 to date)
**49 were preprints, 26 were postprints

Green OA

While the total 2019 numbers will change by year-end, it is likely they will continue along the same trajectory. It is particularly nice to see the bump in Green OA. Unlike Gold and Hybrid OA, there is no publication fee associated with Green OA (which involves depositing a pre- or postprint in a repository of some kind) and it enables authors to publish in their journal of choice. Yet despite its appeal in theory, in practice, Green OA has seen slow growth in part because of publisher constraints that dictate when and where eprints can be deposited.

The "when" refers to embargo periods. Generally, preprints can be deposited immediately because they are versions of research papers that have not yet been published or peer reviewed. However, postprints are versions that have undergone peer review and have been accepted for publication, but have not yet been finalized for publication. Depositing postprints is usually subject to an embargo period of anywhere from 6 to 24 months, sometimes longer.

The "where" refers to the whether the eprint is being uploaded to a personal web site, an institutional or subject repository, or to an academic social network (ASN) like ResearchGate or Academia.edu. In general, embargo periods are the shortest for deposits on personal web sites and the longest for ASNs.

Check out this table for information about both the when and the where for Green OA in forced migration-related journals.

Eprint trends

For some authors funded by research bodies that require immediate OA to published results, the embargo period may effectively eliminate the green route as a viable OA option. However, two trends are changing the eprint landscape. First, some publishers are doing away with embargoes altogether, including SAGE (publisher of International Migration Review) and Emerald (publisher of International Journal of Migration, Health & Social Care). (Cambridge University Press, publisher of the International Review of the Red Cross, has also eliminated embargoes for Humanities and Social Sciences Journals; however, this is a moot point for readers of the Review, as issues are already made freely available on the ICRC's web site.)

Second, there has been a sizable increase in the number and variety of preprint platforms available. (For a list, see section 1.4.1 in this article.) The first preprint repository was arXiv, which caters to the physics, computer science and math communities. The Social Science Research Network (SSRN) and RePEc: Research Papers in Economics platforms were launched subsequently; both are used often by forced migration authors. This activity took place in the 1990s. But since 2012, many more eprint archives have appeared that cater to different subject areas, geographic regions and languages, including PsyArXiv, SocArXiv, Arabixiv, AfricArXivIndiaRxiv and INA-Rxiv (preprint server of Indonesia).

Some of the advantages of preprints are: quick and easy dissemination of research; opportunity to gain feedback from a wider audience; and free for authors to publish/free for users to read. (See these articles for two additional perspectives on the value of preprints: Magori, 2019Sarabipour et al, 2019.) In addition, a recent study of arXiv preprints found "that the text contents of the scientific papers generally changed very little from the pre-print to final published versions."

Perhaps most importantly, preprint repositories - particularly those that are region- and language-specific - have the potential to serve as "digital infrastructures which are truly equal, comprehensive, multi-lingual and allow fair participation in knowledge creation" (Tennant et al., 2019, p. 16).

So where were the 73 preprints that were referenced on my blog in 2019 deposited? SSRN is by far the most popular repository, especially for preprints. But other preprint platforms like platforms like PsyArXiv and SocArXiv are beginning to be used as well. Postprints tend to be deposited in authors' institutional repositories.

Tagged Publications and Web Sites/Tools.

21 October 2019

News: New Report on Asylum Policies in Europe

The Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM) project has published an assessment report entitled "Rethinking EU migration and asylum policies: Managing immigration jointly with countries of origin and transit." The report presents "insights from MEDAM research and policy dialogue since 2016 to explain how closer cooperation among EU member states and with countries of origin and transit can improve outcomes for all stakeholders."

Follow the link for the full report and executive summary.

Related posts:
- Regional Focus: Europe - Pt. 1 (18 Oct. 2019)
Regional Focus: Europe - Pt. 2 (18 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.

News: Open Access Week 2019

Open Access Week is this week: 21-27 October 2019! This year's theme - "Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge" - builds on the 2018 theme, "Designing Equitable Foundations for Open Knowledge." More information is provided in this blog post.

As was done last year, my posts this week will focus on the production and discovery of open access research that is taking place in the Global South.

If you are not yet familiar with the concept of open access, please visit my other blog for an introduction.

If you want to browse through literature that is open access, then you can find listings of OA journals on this page and books over here. And you can also check out my "Open Access Round-up" postings to view a variety of articles that have been made open access through the three main "routes": gold, green and hybrid.

Finally, OA versions of articles in the International Journal of Refugee Law, Journal of Refugee Studies and Refugee Survey Quarterly can be found on the respective journal pages.

Tagged Publications and Web Sites/Tools.

18 October 2019

Regional Focus: Europe - Pt. 2

Blog posts & media:

Forced Movement of Migrants in Bosnia Sparks Warning of Humanitarian Emergency (IOM, Oct. 2019) [text]

How Do Asylum Seekers View Belgium’s Emergency System? (The Conversation, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Moria Migrant Camp on Lesvos Breaks New Record with Nearly 14,000 Residents," Ekathimerini, 15 Oct. 2019 [text]

Reports & journal articles:

Games of Responsibility. The Main Challenges That Asylum Seekers Face in Greece (Radboud University Nijmegen, 2019) [text]

"The Linguistic Integration of Refugees in Italy," Social Sciences, vol. 8, no. 10 (Oct. 2019) [open access]

Making Homelessness Applications for Refugees in England: A Guide for Anyone Supporting Newly Recognised Single Refugees (Refugee Council, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

"Shall We Receive More Refugees or Not? A Comparative Analysis and Assessment of Portuguese Adolescents’ Arguments, Views, and Concerns," Pedagogy, Culture & Society, Latest Articles, 12 Oct. 2019 [open access]

"Using Fear of the 'Other,' Orbán Reshapes Migration Policy in a Hungary Built on Cultural Diversity," Migration Information Source, 10 Oct. 2019 [text]

Related post:
Regional Focus: Europe - Pt. 1 (18 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.

Regional Focus: Europe - Pt. 1

Event:

Odysseus Network: 2019 Yearly Conference, Helsinki, 24-25 October 2019 [info]

Blog posts & media:

"EU Sees Spike in Afghan Migrants as Many Leave Sanctions-stricken Iran," Reuters, 15 Oct. 2019 [text]

Forms and Outcomes of Citizens’ Mobilisations During Europe’s Refugee Reception Crisis (The Conversation, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Launch of Initiative on Eastern Mediterranean Route as Further Displacements Loom," ECRE Weekly Bulletin, 11 Oct. 2019 [text]

"Reporter’s Diary: Four Years of Growing Callousness in the Central Mediterranean," The New Humanitarian, 17 Oct. 2019 [text]

New books:

At Europe’s Edge: Migration and Crisis in the Mediterranean (Oxford Univ. Press, Sept. 2019) [info]
- See also related Border Criminologies blog post.

Caught in Between Borders: Citizens, Migrants and Humans -  Liber Amicorum in Honour of  Prof. Dr. Elspeth Guild, Wolf Legal Publishers, Sept. 2019 [open access]

Reports:

Asylum Authorities: An Overview of Internal Structures and Available Resources (AIDA, Oct. 2019) [text]

Making the CEAS Work, Starting Today, Policy Note, no. 22 (ECRE, Oct. 2019) [text]

Note on the ‘Messina Model’ Applied in the Context of ad hoc Relocation Arrangements Following Disembarkation (European Asylum Support Office, Sept. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

Progress Report on the Implementation of the European Agenda on Migration (European Commission, Oct. 2019) [access]
- Follow link for report and seven factsheets. See also related ECRE comment.

*"Sea of Troubles: Inside the Effort to Rescue Europe’s Unwelcome Immigrants," The New Republic, 17 Oct. 2019 [text]

*"Variation in Policy Success: Radical Right Populism and Migration Policy," West European Politics, vol. 42, no. 3 (2019) [preprint]

*UPDATED

Related post:
- Regional Focus: Europe (9 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications and Events & Opportunities.

Thematic Focus: Statelessness & Nationality - Pt. 2

NATIONALITY:

Publications

"Alienating Citizens," Northwestern University Law Review, vol. 114, no. 1 (2019) [full-text]
- Focuses on the U.S.

Book Review: Citizenship in Question: Evidentiary Birthright and Statelessness (Border Criminologies Blog, Oct. 2019) [text]

Citizenship Hopes Become Reality for Iraq’s Bidoon Minority (UNHCR, Oct. 2019) [text]

Colombia Gives Venezuela Newborns a Start in Life (UNHCR, Oct. 2019) [text]

"Denying Citizenship: Immigration Enforcement and Citizenship Rights in the United States," Studies in Law, Politics, and Society (Forthcoming) [preprint]

European Union Citizenship and the Unlawful Denial of Member State Nationality (SSRN, Sept. 2019) [preprint]

"The Fragility of American Citizenship," The Atlantic, 9 Oct. 2019 [text]

"U.N. Refugee Agency Takes up Case of Potential Stateless in India," Reuters, 2 Oct. 2019 [text]

UNHCR Welcomes Iran’s New Nationality Law Addressing Statelessness (UNHCR, Oct. 2019) [text via ReliefWeb]

Audiovisual media:

What’s Best for Children’s Nationality (ISI & Unicef) [access]
- Six-part podcast series.


Related post:
Thematic Focus: Statelessness & Nationality - Pt. 1 (18 Oct. 2019)

Tagged Publications.